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== cloud.nine.sh ==
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Artur's tech notes

Quick start: virtual machines on OpenBSD

openbsd virtualisation

Since OpenBSD 5.9 it is possible to run virtual machines using a native virtualisation solution.

This is a short note/guide on how to set up a VM on OpenBSD in the simplest way that lets you have a quick play with vmm/vmd.

Preliminaries

  1. First of all, we need to enable vmd on our host and get it running:

    # rcctl enable vmd
    # rcctl start vmd
    
  2. You may also want to make sure you firewall can initially let everything through:

    # Pass everything on the VM interface
    pass quick on tap0
    
    # NAT for the VM network
    pass out on egress from 100.64.0.0/10 to any nat-to (egress)
    

Installation

  1. Let’s assume we store all of our VMs in /var/vm and openbsd will be the name of our experimental VM.

    # mkdir /var/vm/openbsd
    # cd /var/vm/openbsd
    
  2. To install OpenBSD inside of the VM we download the installation image (and store it in the same directory as the VM, which probably is not very clean):

    # wget https://cdn.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/6.9/amd64/install69.iso
    
  3. Then, we create a virtual 10G disk:

    # vmctl create -s 10G openbsd.qcow2
    
  4. To start the VM and boot it from the installation image, we run the following command:

    # vmctl start -m 1G -L -i 1 -r install69.iso -d openbsd.qcow2 openbsd
    
  5. Connect to the console. This effectively finds the console for the openbsd VM and calls cu.

    # vmctl console openbsd
    

    To disconnect from the console you need to type in an escape sequence: ~. (or ~~. if you are connected via SSH).

Configuration of vmd

You can add your VM’s configuration to /etc/vm.conf:

vm "openbsd" {
    memory 1G
    enable
    disk /var/vm/openbsd/openbsd.qcow2
    local interface
}

This will allow you to skip all the additional switches to vmctl start that we used earlier.

Controlling the VM

To control your VM, you can use vmctl:

  • run vmctl status to check the status of all the VMs running in your system, or vmctl status openbsd to check the status of your VM,

  • vmctl start openbsd and vmctl stop openbsd start and stop your VM, respectively.